B2 C1 C2 Expressions Sessions about food

B2 C1 C2 expressions about food

If you are studying for your B2 C1 or C2 level or are simply an English language learner, you know there are tons of expressions to learn. Here we offer you some B2 C1 C2 expressions about food. Let’s face it, expressions about food are the best sort of expressions!

A piece of cake

  • Everyone likes cake. It’s easy to like cake. So, if something is a piece of cake, it means that it is easy to do. It comes from the same meaning of ‘easy as pie’ referring to how easy it is to eat a sweat dessert.
    • Click here to learn how to make carrot cake! It’s as easy as pie.
    • Learning English is a piece of cake with Bloglish!

Spill the beans

  • If you spill the beans, you have said something you shouldn’t have. This is usually when there is a surprise party and you accidently mention it in front of the person whose party it is or if you intentionally tell a secret that someone asked you not to tell.
    • Henry spilled the beans to my mom and now I am grounded for two days.

Go bananas

  • Go bananas or ‘Go ape’ (a less commonly used expression) refer to someone acting in a wild or crazy way. So, it comes from the idea of monkeys (or apes) jumping or swinging around and eating bananas. Sometimes it is difficult to know if the expression means someone is very happy or over-reacting to a situation. It depends on the tone of voice used to say the expression. 
    • They bought a new house and they are just going bananas about it.

There’s no use crying over spilled milk

  • This probably depends on what your parents were like when you were a child. If they yelled at you when you spilled milk, then this expression doesn’t work. The idea is that kids knock over their milk quite often due to being clumsy and since crying won’t bring the milk back, they should just clean it up and get another one. Parents literally would say, there’s no use crying over spilled milk. However, you can apply this to any situation where someone is upset about a past mistake or situation to tell them, it can’t be changed so they just need to accept the consequence and move on.  
    • You lost your keys. There’s no use crying over spilled milk. Get them replaced and move on.

Take it with a grain of salt

  • If someone tells you to take it with a grain of salt, it is a small warning that maybe it’s not 100% true what they are telling you or what they heard. This could be for a number of reasons:
    • They don’t have all the information,
    • Someone is giving you their opinion, not facts,
    • He or she does not think they got it from a reliable source, or
    • maybe they don’t remember all the details.
    • Kelly told me that she is going to make the team, but take it with a grain of salt (because Kelly sometimes lies or exaggerated the truth).

Bring home the bacon

  • This is one of my favorites, simply because it says bacon. Mmm. To bring home the bacon means that you earn money and therefore your house (or home) has money to buy such things as food (bacon). It used to be used mainly in a sexist way, saying women work at home and men bring home the bacon, but this has changed and is now used for anyone who is earning a wage.
    • I got a new job! I’ll finally be able to bring home the bacon.

Butter someone up

  • If you are buttering someone up, it means you are flattering them or saying nice things to them because you need something in return from them. You may tell your teacher she is your favorite teacher before telling her you didn’t do your homework. You may offer to help your boss as much as possible saying you enjoy working for him or her so you can later ask for a raise. Maybe you tell your dad how wonderful his cooking is before asking permission to go to a concert. Either way, you are buttering someone up so they are more likely to give you what you want. Naturally, everything is better with butter.
    • Are you buttering me up? What do you want?

That’s the way the cookie crumbles

  • If you eat a good cookie, it should crumble a bit because that’s just what happens when you eat a cookie. This is a metaphor for life, sometimes things just happen and there’s not much we can do about it. Sometimes things will go in your favor and other times they won’t. Your team played the best they could but they lost the game. You had a great interview but they gave the job to someone else. You like a boy but he likes your best friend. That’s just the way the cookie crumbles sometimes and there’s not much we can do about it.
  • I’m really sorry to hear that you didn’t make the team. That’s just the way the way the cookie crumbles sometimes.

Now that you’ve learned these B2 C1 C2 Expressions about food, learn more from other Expressions Sessions

vocab rehab - interior del coche

Vocabulario interior del coche

En el post anterior te explicamos todos las partes del exterior del coche, pero el vocabulario del interior del coche tambien puede resultar necesario. Alquilar un coche para viajar este verano no puede ser más fácil.

Conduciendo en un pais que no es el tuyo

Recuerdo  la primera clase de conducir que tomé en España. Había vivido ya más de 10 años en países de habla hispana, pero no sabía ni cómo llamar al volante. ¿Cómo puede explicarse que no sabía los nombres de las diferentes partes en el interior del coche? Tenía una licencia de conducir desde los 16 años pero en este tema mi español estaba en blanco.

Muchas veces no aprendemos el vocabulario necesario hasta que lo tenemos que utilizar. Y ese fue mi caso. Así que hice un esfuerzo para explicarle al profesor de la auto-escuela la función de cada cosa dentro del coche para mostrarle que si hablaba Castellano, solo que no sabía los nombres de esas cosas.

Así que, no quiero que te pase lo mismo. Aquí tienes todo el vocabulario necesario para hablar con cualquiera sobre las partes del interior del coche.

Vocabulario para interior del coche con traducciones y ejemplos

  • Steering Wheel – volante  
    • Don’t grab the steering wheel while I’m driving! That’s very dangerous.
  • Claxon (UK) / Horn (US) – bocina
    • I really don’t like when people use their claxon for everything. Sometimes it is not necessary.
  • Storage compartment (UK) / Glove compartment (US) – guantera
    • I usually leave my wallet in the glove compartment when I go hiking because I don’t think I’ll need it.
  • Door handle – manilla
    • Careful with the door handle. I think one of the screws are loose and it may come off.
  • Stick shift – palanca de cambios
  • Gas pedal – acelerador   
    • There’s an expression that goes ‘put the pedal to the medal’. It means that you should step on the gas pedal so hard that it hits the metal of the car and you go as fast as you can.
  • Brake pedal – pedal de freno
    • In the beginning I found it difficult to use my right foot for the brake pedal since I was always used to using my left.
  • Clutch – embrague
    • I found that the hardest part about learning to drive was using the clutch to start the car.
  • Air bag – airbag
    • Most cars today have air bags for both the driver and the passenger as well as for the back seat passengers.
  • Vent – conducto
    • We had the air conditioning on high but nothing was coming out. It was because we had the vents closed!
  • Indicator (UK) / Turn signal (US) – indicador
    • In the US we always put our turn signal on before looking to see if I can get over, but in Spain you need to make sure you can get over and then put your turn signal on. This can causes a lot of confusion and angry drivers.

¡Buen viaje!

Vocab Rehab: Collocations with money

Vocab Rehab – Collocations with money

Vocab Rehab: Collocations with money

#Collocations are words that go together in a certain language. All of the words above collocate with the word money. Let’s take a look at their meanings.

  • to fork out money – To unwillingly pay an amount of money.
    • Fork out some money for the drinks!
  • to sink money into – to spend or invest a large amount of money on something.
    • She sank all her money into that new car.
  • to extort money – to obtain money for force or threat
    • The gang has been found guilty of extorting money from the local shops.
  • to funnel money – to send money directly and intentionally to someone or some place.
    • The Managing Director funneled money from the business to his closest friends.
  • to hoard money – to collect large amounts of money and keep it for yourself.
    • It was quite common for WWII victims to hoard money at home since a lot of their money was taken from them unwillingly during the war.
  • to squander money – to waste a large amount of money
    • Betting on games is the quickest way to squander your money, especially if you do not know how it works.
  • to shell out money – to pay money for something, especially when it is unexpected or not wanted.
    • The government shelled out money for vaccines that can not be used.
  • to siphon off – to dishonestly take money from someone or something.
    • She lost her job when they found out she was siphoning money from the community resources.
  • to pay out money – to pay a lot of money to someone
    • The company was forced to pay out money to the client because they didn’t want to go to court.
  • to withdraw money – to take money out
    • I will withdraw the money from the cash machine later this afternoon so I have cash for the dinner.