Off the cuff, Episode 10: a Carp load of football

Learn English Podcast : Off the Cuff : A crap load of football

In Episode 10 of off the cuff Clare and Annie talk about #Ronaldo #UEFA #football #CocaCola and the topic of influencers. How much influence should they really have on us and on things like #LGBTQ rights? Find vocabulary and transcripts below.

Vocabulary from Episode 10

  • What’s on the menu today – this is a fun way of asking what the topic of the show is today. You can use it in any situation where there is a planned schedule, although it may not always be appropriate for work settings. In the example below, we want to know what the activities for the day are.
    • I know you’ve been planning this trip for months, so what’s on the menu today?
  • Obscure – not known by many people. In this case, Annie is being sarcastic, since football is well-known all over the world, particularly in Spain, where they currently reside.
    • I forgot the name of the island they are visiting. It’s some obscure place off the coast.
  • To be glued to your television – If someone is glued to their television, it means that they are very attentive to what is happening on TV.
    • I don’t watch much TV, but when the Olympics are on, I am just glued to the TV.
  • Crap load – this is a way to express a large quantity of something but in a way that shows your disapproval of the amount.
    • Those kids have a crap load of toys and yet they’re always bored.
  • 31 million – 31,000,000
    • I do not make 31 million euros a year.
  • to get/take a hit from something – this is used to say that you will be negatively impacted by what happened.
    • The economy took a huge hit from COVID.
  • to be down something, usually money – having less than you expected or usually have.
    • I lost a bet and now I’m down 100 euros.
  • to get wind of a something – to find out about something, especially a secret.
    • I don’t want my boss to get wind of my new job.
  • LGBTQ – Acronym used for referring to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer people.
    • Pride month is celebrated in order to acknowledge and support the LGBTQ community.
  • Paedophiles – people who are sexually attracted to pre-pubescent children.
    • There is a controversial online website where you can see if there is a registered paedophile living near your home.
  • God forbid – This expression is usually used to show sarcasm as Clare is doing here in the podcast. We usually use this expression to show that we think the other person is overreacting or wrong.
    • God forbid I come into work 2 minutes late because I was stuck in traffic!
  • UEFA – acronym for Union of European Football Association.
    • UEFA decided not to punish the German player who showed his support for the LGBTQ community.
  • get down on two knees – here Clare is referencing the players who supported Black Lives Matter by kneeling down on one knee. Since players may not be able to wear any kind of arm bands for Gay Pride, getting down on two knees could be an alternative. She is showing irony that one thing is ok, but not the other.

To find out more about the topics discussed today, you can find them at the following links:
NYT: Munich Wanted to Light Its Stadium in a Pride Rainbow. European Soccer Said No.
The Guardian: Hungary passes law banning LGBT content in schools or kids’ TV
Business Standard: Footballer Cristiano Ronaldo knocks off $4 billion from Coca-Cola’s value

Transcript of episode 10

Clare: Hi, Annie.
Annie: Hi, Clare. How are you?
Clare: Good, good.
Annie: Happy Pride Month.
Clare: Happy Pride Month. Yes. So what’s on the menu today? What are we going to talk about?
Annie: Anything but Coca Cola?
Clare: Why do you think it might influence people? Okay, Let’s talk about football. That doesn’t have any influence on people.
Annie: No, no. Football. Football’s, like this obscure thing that happens.
Clare: You mean you haven’t been glued to your television? You haven’t had two PCRs a day just to make sure that you can go to watch all these football matches and be there.
Annie: I mean, you know, I don’t even know if my television has football, and I’m okay with that.
Clare: Okay, so let’s take it back to football again. Okay?
Annie: Let’s talk about football. Okay.
Clare: Let’s talk about. Let’s talk about football and Coca Cola. Why would we talk about football and Coca Cola and influence? Because we’re talking about influence.
Annie: Yeah, Okay, so I don’t watch football as, as I just mentioned, but I do know what’s happening around the game of football.
Clare: Okay.
Annie: All right. So let me explain. There is this football player who makes what we would say a crap load of money, right?
Clare: And, does he play for Alaves?
Annie: No, no, he doesn’t. His name is Ronaldo. I think you might have heard of him, because even though I don’t know anything about football, I do know that there’s this man named Ronaldo who makes, like, 31 million a year and he was sitting down for a press conference with a can of Coca Cola in front of him or a bottle of Coca Cola, and he decided to move it and tell his audience to drink more water.
Clare: Okay, so that was his influence over his followers or whatever. What exactly did that influence do?
Annie: Well, there’s more to this story, right? So, not only does this man who makes crap loads of money tell everyone not to drink Coca Cola, but to drink more water, but then it has a 5 billion impact on Coca Cola.
Clare: Are you serious?
Annie: I am totally serious, Clare.
Clare: But surely those… Coca Cola  are his boss? No? because the sponsors are the people who pay this 31 million to all these players.
Annie: Surely. I mean, part of the money.
Clare: Were his friends annoyed? Were his fellow players annoyed? Were Coca Cola annoyed or just everybody’s just a… Who’s the bigger influencer here? Coca Cola? Ronaldo? It’s a bit…
Annie: Well, I’m sure his team. I don’t know enough about football or this story other than that, but I’m sure his team gets a hit from that. Or maybe if the Coca Cola decides not to sponsor them, I’m sure that would affect their whole team.
Clare: He might be down a few billion himself.
Annie: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Well, I would kind of hope, I have to admit, because I think that the fact that he makes 31 million a year is a bit too much. But anyway, it’s interesting, the influence this man has and football.
Clare: Let’s go back to football again.
Annie: Okay. Okay, fine.
Clare: Because, you know, it’s important, influential. it’s happening this month like, Yeah. So as I said, I wasn’t watching matches either like. But again, the world around football, I do get wind of a few things. June, as you know, is LGBTQ month. And there was a match in between Germany and Hungary. And at the same time, the Prime Minister, a law has been or a decree has been passed where they’re not allowed to depict or promote homosexuality or anything homosexual onto under 18s. And as part of a law against paedophiles, you know you can connected.
Annie: What ?
Clare: Now, you cannot connect the two? Right?
Annie: I cannot connect the two. Wait, what?
Clare: In Hungry, it’s believed. And this is kind of the law, like, because of this, is that if two people meet, especially for the same sex, it’s not healthy.
Annie: Okay.
Clare: So they meet, you know, God forbid they fall in love.
Annie: Okay.
Clare: Set up a house and they might even adopt children.
Annie: Right. Right.
Clare: Okay. No. Because what they really are are Paedophiles.
Annie: Oh Clare.
Clare: That’s why I know. It’s just sad. Real. Anyway, back into football, it’s come.
Annie: No, I can’t even joke about that topic because it’s not funny.
Clare: It’s not funny.
Annie: It’s not.
Clare: So Let’s go back to football.
Annie: Okay. So go back to football because I prefer to talk about football than that conversation.
Clare: I know, but football influences things you see. So there was a match between Germany and Hungry around the same time with this crazy decree or whatever was passed. And the match was in Munich.
Annie: Right.
Clare: And they wanted to, like, they’ve done in another Stadium. I think they wanted to paint it pink or light it up pink.
Annie: Okay.
Clare: And UEFA said no, because it was kind of a political statement. Again, don’t hold me to that statement. But something along those lines…
Annie: yeah.
Clare: Because it was too political. Then there was a German goalkeeper, I think, who had a band on his arm again with the LBGTQ support or whatever. And they’re going to decide now whether that is too politically, yeah. So what do you do? Do you get down on two knees?
Annie: Well that’s interesting.
Clare: A knee for this, a knee for that
Annie: Yeah Exactly. We’re going to have to start doing, like, hand gestures.
Clare: It, it’s sad. It’s sad. It’s not funny. But it’s a sad reality no? And again. What are we talking about? We’re talking about football.

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