Expression Sessions - Time

Expressions Sessions – Time

Expressions sessions - Time

The CAE, C1 exam is full of expressions. Here are just a few that are important, not just for the exam, but because we use them all the time!

  • play for time – delay something until you are ready
    • The actors aren’t ready yet. You’ll have to play for time with the audience for at least another 15 minutes.
  • take your time – spend the time you need to complete something OR – slow down.
    • Stop rushing! Take your time. We still have another hour before they arrive.
  • have a great time – Used to tell someone to enjoy themselves OR to express that you enjoyed yourself. It can also be used with other adjectives: bad time, good time, an ok time.
    • Have a great time at the wedding. I’m sure it will be fun!
    • We had such a good time going through the old photos.
  • do something to pass the time – To do something to keep busy while you are waiting.
    • How about we play a game to pass the time while we wait for the food to be ready?
  • make up for lost time – to enjoy something as much as possible now because you didn’t have the opportunity or didn’t want to do it before.
    • Every time I go to the US, I make up for lost time with my best friends and we talk for hours about everything that has happened since we last saw each other.
  • arrive in good time – finish a journey faster than expected.
    • Although there was some construction on the road, they made it in good time to the party.
  • be on time – to arrive somewhere at the exact time or earlier than the time that was arranged.
    • I have to leave now if I want to be on time for the theatre.
  • make time for something – to block off or organize some time to complete something or to be with someone.
    • She had a really busy morning but she made some time for us to have a coffee.
  • did something in no time – to do something in very little time or very quickly.
    • The shipment will be ready to go in no time.
    • The children finished their homework in no time and went to the patio to play.
  • did something time after time – to do the same thing over and over again, repeatedly.
    • I have to tell me children to pick up their wet towel off the floor time and time again.
  • time flies – used to say that the time spent doing something has gone by very quickly.
    • I can’t believe it’s already 7:30! It’s true that time flies when you’re having fun.
  • ran out of time – To have no more time to finish something or to get somewhere.
    • We are running out of time. The deadline for the tenner is this Friday.
Vocab Rehab: Collocations with money

Vocab Rehab – Collocations with money

Vocab Rehab: Collocations with money

#Collocations are words that go together in a certain language. All of the words above collocate with the word money. Let’s take a look at their meanings.

  • to fork out money – To unwillingly pay an amount of money.
    • Fork out some money for the drinks!
  • to sink money into – to spend or invest a large amount of money on something.
    • She sank all her money into that new car.
  • to extort money – to obtain money for force or threat
    • The gang has been found guilty of extorting money from the local shops.
  • to funnel money – to send money directly and intentionally to someone or some place.
    • The Managing Director funneled money from the business to his closest friends.
  • to hoard money – to collect large amounts of money and keep it for yourself.
    • It was quite common for WWII victims to hoard money at home since a lot of their money was taken from them unwillingly during the war.
  • to squander money – to waste a large amount of money
    • Betting on games is the quickest way to squander your money, especially if you do not know how it works.
  • to shell out money – to pay money for something, especially when it is unexpected or not wanted.
    • The government shelled out money for vaccines that can not be used.
  • to siphon off – to dishonestly take money from someone or something.
    • She lost her job when they found out she was siphoning money from the community resources.
  • to pay out money – to pay a lot of money to someone
    • The company was forced to pay out money to the client because they didn’t want to go to court.
  • to withdraw money – to take money out
    • I will withdraw the money from the cash machine later this afternoon so I have cash for the dinner.

off the cuff, episode 7: The elephant in the room

off the cuff: The elephant in the room

Que quiere decir el ‘Elephant in the room’? ¿Por que tintan el río de Chicago verde este mes? ¿De donde viene St. Patrick? Todas las respuestas y más en este episodio de #offthecuff

Vocabulary

  • March Madness- the time period in March when the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) college basketball tournament takes place in the US.
  • The ides of March – March 15, best known as the day Julius Cesar was assassinated
  • The elephant in the room – an obvious problem that no one wants to talk about
  • To march – to walk through the streets, usually to protest something.
  • Lockdown – an emergency situation where people are not allowed to leave. See episode 1 of off the cuff.
  • To feel at ease – to feel relaxed or comfortable with someone or about something.
  • Amnesty Day – to not have to follow a rule or law for that day. See episode 6 of off the cuff
  • St. Patrick’s Day – a day to celebrate the Irish Patron Saint (Patrick) who brought Christianity to Ireland.
  • Parades – to walk or march somewhere, usually as part of a public celebration.
  • Dye – to change the color of something using a specific liquid
  • Punishment – to make someone do something they don’t want to do because they have done something wrong
  • Gaelic – a Celtic language spoken by some people in Ireland and an official language of the Republic of Ireland
  • Famine – A situation in which there is not enough food for a large amount of people, causing illness and death
  • To find your roots – to find your family origins, the place they came from and the customs that they held in order to feel connected to them.
  • Blow something away – to be very surprised by something
  • Rowdy – noisy and possibly violent